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Story in Literary Fiction added 2 new photos.

How do unsuccessful literary novel-writers build houses?

You get a backhoe and dig a BIG hole. You back up a cement truck and pour three BIG mounds of cement. While cement hardens, you cut down two giant oaks, strip the leaves and throw the trunks with limbs in the big hole on top of the cement. You pour 100 gallons of glue, 0.34 tons of bolts and nails, five porcelain toilets, three bathtubs and eleven sinks. You add 759 light bulbs of various sizes throughout the growing muddle. You mix 294 gallons of paint in different, preferable incompatible (noncliché) colors, and splash the paint at random over all you've assembled. Let the mess simmer for five months during a preferably horribly hot summer. Add 3,706 roof tiles--no need to remove from the packaging. Voila! A house.

Whats the point? Authors of literary stories need to be in control of their thinking and their imagination and then create story by mastering the elements of fiction prose and storytelling. Here are three of the important ideas to conquer:

*Structure--beginning, middle, and end.
Writers need structure, an overall outline that directs happenings, action, emotional arcs, and prioritizes ideas and timing of information transfer. Literary stories have images and movement that are delivered logically structured on a timeline. Author ideas and thoughts generated by chance and randomly applied to story, no matter the quality of idea or thought, are not as effective as imagined elements structured into coherent, logical web that supports story momentum.

*Purpose.
Fiction writers need altruism and must: not write primarily for fame and fortune, not write solely to be published to claim "author" at social gatherings, but write to engage, entertain, and enlighten readers by creating and telling a story well and building characters specific for story understanding and meaning.

*Creativity and imagination.
Writers need to imagine and create, not remember and describe. Imagination for literary fiction does not come from sitting alone in a dark, soundproof, enclosed and uncomfortable cubicle until memories emerge from author's life experiences like sea creatures from a peat bog. In fiction, action scenes are imagined that move the plot, build characters consistent with the timeline, and relate to purpose and theme of the story. Authors who default only to their own worldview and life experiences overlook the advantages of imagined fiction made available by embracing and incorporating the world beyond self.

*Example story
"The Miracle of Madame Villard" is the story of a boy on a mission to find a cure for his dying mother. His mother knows she will die and must create a stable future for her son. Set in late 18th century France, the story is structured in synergistic, related scenes and elements of story are imagined. You can read it online, download, or listen for free, or purchase print versions.
(http://storyinliteraryfiction.com/original-stories…)
_______________________

LITERARY (character-based dramatic plots, theme and meaning, unique characterization) FICTION (imagined) needs writers who train in traditional successful literary techniques. I'm trying to find like thinkers. If you find these ideas acceptable and possibly useful to someone you know, would you SHARE this post?

For ORIGINAL STORY EXAMPLES, ESSAYS, INTERVIEWS, A WORKSHOP, BLOG. ILLUSTRATIONS, explore this link: storyinliteraryfiction.com. And if inclined, please share.

And thanks.
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Posted 2 weeks ago

How  do unsuccessful literary novel-writers build houses?

You get a backhoe and dig a BIG hole.  You back up a cement truck and pour three BIG mounds of cement.  While cement hardens, you cut down two giant oaks, strip the leaves and throw the trunks with limbs in the big hole on top of the cement.  You pour 100 gallons of glue, 0.34 tons of bolts and nails, five porcelain toilets, three bathtubs and eleven sinks. You add 759 light bulbs of various sizes throughout the growing muddle. You mix 294 gallons of paint in different, preferable incompatible (noncliché) colors, and splash the paint at random over all youve assembled.  Let the mess simmer for five months during a preferably horribly hot summer.  Add 3,706 roof tiles--no need to remove from the packaging. Voila!  A house.

Whats the point? Authors of literary stories need to be in control of their thinking and their imagination and then create story by mastering the elements of fiction prose and storytelling.  Here are three of the important ideas to conquer: 

*Structure--beginning, middle, and end.
Writers need structure, an overall outline that directs happenings, action, emotional arcs, and prioritizes ideas and timing of information transfer.  Literary stories have images and movement that are delivered logically structured on a timeline.  Author ideas and thoughts generated by chance and randomly applied to story, no matter the quality of idea or thought, are not as effective as imagined elements structured into coherent, logical web that supports story momentum.

*Purpose.
Fiction writers need altruism and must: not write primarily for fame and fortune, not write solely to be published to claim author at social gatherings, but write to engage, entertain, and enlighten readers by creating and telling a story well and building characters specific for story understanding and meaning.

*Creativity and imagination.
Writers need to imagine and create, not remember and describe.  Imagination for literary fiction does not come from sitting alone in a dark, soundproof, enclosed and uncomfortable cubicle until memories emerge from authors life experiences like sea creatures from a peat bog.  In fiction, action scenes are imagined that move the plot, build characters consistent with the timeline, and relate to purpose and theme of the story.  Authors who default only to their own worldview and life experiences overlook the advantages of imagined fiction made available by embracing and incorporating the world beyond self.  

*Example story
The Miracle of Madame Villard is the story of a boy on a mission to find a cure for his dying mother. His mother knows she will die and must create a stable future for her son.  Set in late 18th century France, the story is structured in synergistic, related scenes and elements of story are imagined. You can read it online, download, or listen for free, or purchase print versions.
(http://www.storyinliteraryfiction.com/original-stories-william-h-coles/the-miracle-of-madame-villard/)
_______________________

LITERARY (character-based dramatic plots, theme and meaning, unique characterization) FICTION (imagined) needs writers who train in traditional successful literary techniques.  Im trying to find like thinkers.  If you find these ideas acceptable and possibly useful to someone you know, would you SHARE this post?  

For ORIGINAL STORY EXAMPLES, ESSAYS, INTERVIEWS, A WORKSHOP, BLOG. ILLUSTRATIONS, explore this link: storyinliteraryfiction.com.  And if inclined, please share. 

And thanks.

Anna Savvides, Tracy Graves and 1544 others like this

View previous comments

PэrypatetikNot just writers need structure :-)

2 weeks ago   ·  5

Jo Anne Du BoseI look forward to these posts! Thank you!

2 weeks ago   ·  4

8 Replies

Joe AtkinsGood points, particularly that of writers thinking beyond their own worldview and experiences.

2 weeks ago   ·  10

Vernetta HallFunny! Humor from a writer is worth a thousand hee- haws nd hardy hars!

2 weeks ago   ·  5

Sharon LyonI don't think writers need structure. You look at the same tree everyday, it begins to talk to you. If you've got imagination, it gives itself structure.

2 weeks ago   ·  13

7 Replies

Eve GaalSounds like an updated Walden Pond.

2 weeks ago   ·  1

Alfonso Omar SaldañaJust what I needed to read. Thanks!!

2 weeks ago   ·  2

Caitlen HillI've always hated outlines, but reminders of why they are important help me find the motivation to use them more. Thank you.

1 week ago   ·  5

Linda DrottSuch an education,thanks Jeff.

1 week ago   ·  2

Ann Pat IrelandWonderful information.

1 week ago   ·  2

Phyllis FergusonPlenty to think about. Much appreciated.

1 week ago   ·  2

Karen NijimThank you for inspiring me!!!

1 week ago   ·  2

Kevin Espeseth...because that is what big money / Hollywood pays for; emotional junk.

1 week ago   ·  4

Marcie MalloryVery informative and intriguing. Thank you!

1 week ago   ·  2

Ian Graham LeaskWhy are you trying to find 'like thinkers'?

1 week ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Judi DelpieroGood points for Piper Pittman to read, copy and put to use as she continues to write.

1 week ago

Ranea SpicerLol

1 week ago

Mark ArnoldKaren Arnold

1 week ago

Phil SimonAnd then came " Fear and Loathing "

1 week ago   ·  3

Sophie DolphinWow

1 week ago

Cynthia GurinYou forgot one of the most important parts... The story, regardless of genre, must actually make sense within its context. In other words, the author can't simply write, "She fell from the fourth floor but fortunately she was unharmed." One must actually explain how that happened and the explanation must actually make scientific (or fictional) sense to the critically thinking reader.

1 week ago   ·  11

2 Replies

Jeff KennedyMan,i have been schooled! Don't write for money. Got it.

1 week ago

James BeattyThanks I really needed that

7 days ago   ·  1

Linda MorganVery interesting!

7 days ago

Nina NewtonWould love to learn more.

7 days ago

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